India

Conditions favorable in India, more cheetahs to be brought from Namibia-South Africa: Laurie Marker

Laurie Marker said that India was thinking of relocation after the cheetah was declared extinct. The plan was made in 2009 by a team of experts from the government and the forestry department.

Laurie Marker, executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund.

Eight cheetahs from Namibia have been brought to India a day after the cheetah disappeared from Indian soil seven decades ago. These cheetahs were released in the Kuno National Park in Madhya Pradesh. Cheetah Conservation Fund Executive Director Laurie Marker has said that India is working with South Africa and Namibia to bring more cheetahs to India. In the coming years, Namibia and Cheetah will be sent to India. After the arrival of eight cheetahs in India from Namibia on Saturday, Laurie said that since its extinction, you can only bring the animal from anywhere else. He said that to increase the population of cheetahs in India, more cheetahs will have to be brought. India is working more with South Africa and Namibia is also going to send more cheetahs in the coming years.

He further said that saving the cheetah means changing the world. Yesterday we brought Cheetah back to India after 70 years of extinction. Their extinction was human-caused and their existence is also in the hands of humans. Only we can save the earth, ourselves and the cheetah. The American expert has been an advisor to the Indian government on the Cheetah Rehabilitation Project over the past 12 years. When asked whether African cheetahs will easily adapt to Indian conditions. In response, he said that the species is adaptable and has a history of their presence in India.

Effort was going on since 2009 – Lorry

Laurie Marker said that India was thinking of relocation after the cheetah was declared extinct. The plan was made in 2009 by a team of experts from the government and the forestry department. Favorable conditions will be challenging and we all need to work hard in our field. Monitoring efforts will have to be made.

Fear is haunting the people around

Amidst the excitement of the arrival of cheetahs in the Kuno National Park (KNP) in Sheopur district of Madhya Pradesh, the fear of acquisition of their land and the possibility of attacking them by cheetahs in the minds of the villagers living in the surrounding areas, There are concerns. However, some villagers are hopeful that after KNP became famous due to the arrival of cheetahs, new employment opportunities will be created due to the increase in the number of tourists there. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other leaders released eight cheetahs brought from Namibia into special enclosures set up at the KNP on Saturday morning. Cheetahs became extinct in India in 1952, so these cheetahs have been brought here under Project Cheetah to settle them in India.

20-25 cheetahs can live in Kuno National Park

There is enough space to keep 20 to 25 cheetahs and hunt for their food in the Kuno National Park (KNP), located in Sheopur district of Madhya Pradesh, the newly settled African cheetah in India. An official gave this information. Eight cheetahs brought from Namibia in a special B747 aircraft were released into the KNP on 17 September, bringing the park into the limelight around the world. Of these eight cheetahs, five are females and three are males. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other dignitaries on Saturday morning released eight cheetahs brought from Namibia in special enclosures of the KNP as part of the project to resettle the extinct cheetah population in India in 1952.

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